Monday, February 24, 2014

Rhythms of the Game: How to Perform at Your Best: Music and Athletics

I've always loved Bernie Williams. He played his entire 16-year career in Major League Baseball with the New York Yankees from 1991 through 2006.

Yankee fans adore him.

Williams' ability to play major league baseball at a high level was directly influenced by his musical training and his deep understanding of the similarities between musical artistry and athletic performance.

Through a series of conversations, narratives, and sidebars, the authors (Bernie Williams, Dave Gluck, and Bob Thompson) discover and reveal the influence of music and its rhythms on the game of baseball. Readers of Rhythms of the Game will gain an insight into the similarities between musical artistry and athletic performance. The book is written for musicians and athletes looking to improve their level of performance on the stage or on the field, as well as for a general audience interested in gaining a deeper understanding of the underlying influence of music on the game of baseball.

The College of Idaho will welcome Gluck to campus for a talk called “Rhythms of the Game: How to Perform at Your Best,” beginning at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 25, inside the Langroise Center for Performing and Fine Arts. The event is free and open to the public.

“Rhythms of the Game” is a multimedia presentation based upon Gluck’s award-winning book, which he co-authored with former New York Yankees outfielder and guitarist Bernie Williams as well as Grammy-nominated music producer Bob Thompson. The presentation takes the audience on a journey from “good” to “great” and explains how elite athletes and artists conquer their fears, embrace failure and ultimately achieve extraordinary success. The presentation also explains how what works for athletes and musicians can work for anyone, anywhere – whether it’s a concert stage, an athletic field, a classroom or even the office.

Gluck’s presentation also features exclusive video footage of Williams speaking directly to the audience as he provides insight and commentary to demonstrate how he applied various performance techniques and mindsets to high-pressure situations on the field.

And see my arts and culture blog.

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